C2C Country To Country

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When Mo Pitney sings "let me tell you about country" in his debut single, he's doing more than telling. He's showing. Appropriately titled, the song "Country" is as much positioning statement as introduction. In three minutes and 16seconds, it is almost precisely who he is in word and deed. The vocal delivery, storytelling, musicianship and reflections of his outdoor lifestyle – as well as faith, family and patriotism – offer a spot-on portrayal. Joined by early fan favorites "Clean Up On Aisle Five" and "Come Do A Little Life," the song carves an unmistakably country yet completely fresh groove for the genre. In short, it sounds like nothing else, but absolutely belongs. 

To paraphrase the song, a life in music isn't a place on a map; it's a place in Mo Pitney's heart. "I just love music," Pitney says, exhibiting atypical maturity for someone still in their early twenties. "It has never been about praise. Playing the Grand Ole Opry was an amazing experience, but I have just as much fun sitting on my bed playing along to an old record. It's always been that way.

Encouraged to move to Nashville by a songwriting friend, Pitney was the uncommon arrival who receives early interest from record labels. He signed with Curb and began working on bringing his songs and sound into alignment with his musical vision. One of the lynchpins was connecting with his producer, Tony Brown (George Strait). "Instead of trying to put some songs together to come out of my mouth and create an artist with my face, Tony said, 'I want to find out who you are, pull it out of you and put it on tape.' It wasn’t just the way he said it, it was in everything he did. Realizing I can create a record the way I want to and use the musicians I want was an eye-opening experience. We recorded my vocals while I was sitting on a stool and playing guitar at the same time, so it’s a live record in a lot of ways. My hands were untied." 

Perhaps the best expression of how Mo Pitney has created his own definition of country music success is found in "Behind This Guitar," a song by Don Sampson and Phil O'Donnell that may not even make the album. "People tell me 
I can’t cut it because the chorus says, 'Behind this guitar there’s just a boy who had a dream in his heart, behind thisguitar there’s just a guy that can’t believe he got this far.' And they point out that I haven't gotten anywhere yet, so save it for the second album. But I remember sitting on my bed with the dream of just making music the rest of my life. It wasn’t that I had to be on radio or even make a living doing it. I just loved music. Now I’m on the Opry. I have a record deal. And I’m loving the music that I’m making. I can't believe I got this far! "I’m probably just going to cut the song."

Mo Pitney